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Posts under tag: Mexico

April 29, 2016

Spring Film Series. Ayotzinapa: Crónica de un crimen de estado

Film Viewing: Ayotzinapa: Crónica de un crimen de estado

Ayotzinapa: Chronicle of a Crime of State is the story of the forced disappearance of 43 student teachers, which exposes the criminal complicity between the police and military authorities, and the political and economic elite of Mexico. TRT 101 minutes.

May 4th, 2016 5:00 p.m. Straub 156

Film to be followed by a round table with Anabel López Salinas (CLLAS Postdoctoral Fellow), Erin Gallo (PhD candidate in Romance Languages), Eduardo Corona (Center for Intercultural Organizing, Washington County), Antonio Salgado (Ayotzinapa in Eugene), Pedro García-Caro (Director, Latin American Studies Program).

We will connect directly via telephone conference with the mother of one of the 43 disappeared students.

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Facebook Link to the Event

Watch the trailer here!

November 18, 2015

Julie Weise (History) publishes Corazón de Dixie: Mexicanos in the U.S. South since 1910

Julie Weise’s new book on Mexicanos in the South has just been released by University of North Carolina Press. Julie Weise is an assistant professor in the UO Department of History and a faculty member associated with LAS and CLLAS.

Corazón de Dixie: Mexicanos in the U.S. South since 1910, by Julie M. Weise (November 2015, University of North Carolina Press) 358 pp., published with support provided by the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas; David J. Weber Series in the New Borderlands History.

When Latino migration to the U.S. South became increasingly visible in the 1990s, observers and advocates grasped for ways to analyze “new” racial dramas in the absence of historical reference points. However, as this book is the first to comprehensively document, Mexicans and Mexican Americans have a long history of migration to the U.S. South. Corazón de Dixie recounts the untold histories of Mexicanos’ migrations to New Orleans, Mississippi, Arkansas, Georgia, and North Carolina as far back as 1910. It follows Mexicanos into the heart of Dixie, where they navigated the Jim Crow system, cultivated community in the cotton fields, purposefully appealed for help to the Mexican government, shaped the southern conservative imagination in the wake of the civil rights movement, and embraced their own version of suburban living at the turn of the twenty-first century.

Rooted in U.S. and Mexican archival research, oral history interviews, and family photographs, Corazón de Dixie unearths not just the facts of Mexicanos’ long-standing presence in the U.S. South but also their own expectations, strategies, and dreams.weise_corazon_PB-199x300

 

November 6, 2015

Elena Poniatowska, Testimony, and Social Memory in Mexico: The 1985 Earthquake

November 13th, Oregon Humanities Center, Noon-1pm. Humanities Center Conference Room (159 PLC). Work-in-Progress Series talk by Lynn Stephen, 2015-16 Provost’s Senior Humanist Fellow

Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Ethnic Studies at the University of Oregon and co-director of the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS)

Open to the public. Early arrival suggested due to limited seating. Brown bag lunches welcome. Please direct disability accommodation requests to the Humanities Center at (541) 346-3934. l.stephen_poniatowska-lecture

 

October 31, 2015

Día de los muertos at the UO

Altar 2015 JSMADÍA DE LOS MUERTOS CELEBRATION
Thu, Fri, Sun, Mon Oct 29, 30; Nov 1, 2. 6:00pm to 9:00pm
This popular annual event is filled with music, poetry, art, dialogue and a traditional ofrenda is constructed to celebrate the holiday. The event is co-sponsored by Oak Hill School in conjunction with the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, MEChA de UO, Adelante Sí, el Instituto de Cultura de Guanajuato, el Instituto Estatal de Migrante Guanajuatense y sus familias, CBT Nuggets, and Latin American Studies Program. Visit http://jsma.uoregon.edu/DiadelosMuertos for information about all four dates, October 29, October 30, November 1, and November 2.

– See more here

February 25, 2014

The Role of Public Art in the Oaxaca Rebellion of 2006

Wednesday, March 5 at 2 p.m.

Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, Ford Lecture Hall

César Chávez Victoria, artist and member of the ASARO (Asamblea de Artistas Revolucionarios de   Oaxaca/The Assembly of Revolutionary Artists of Oaxaca) collective, will discuss the founding of the group and its role in the 2006 Oaxaca Rebellion. This year marks the 8th anniversary of the collective’s commitment to engendering social change through art.

The contents of this public presentation were developed under a grant from the Undergraduate International Studies and Foreign Language (UISFL) Program, International Studies Division, U.S. Department of Education. However, those contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government. Additional support was provided by the College of Arts and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art.

November 17, 2013

We Are the Face of Oaxaca: Testimony and Social Movements by Lynn Stephen

We Are the Face of Oaxaca: Testimony and Social Movements
by Lynn Stephen
Duke University Press
(September 2013)

A massive uprising against the Mexican state of Oaxaca began with the emergence of the Popular Assembly of the Peoples of Oaxaca (APPO) in June 2006. A coalition of more than 300 organizations, APPO disrupted the functions of Oaxaca’s government for six months. It began to develop an inclusive and participatory political vision for the state. Testimonials were broadcast on radio and television stations appropriated by APPO, shared at public demonstrations, debated in homes and in the streets, and disseminated around the world via the Internet.

The movement was met with violent repression. Participants were imprisoned, tortured, and even killed. Lynn Stephen emphasizes the crucial role of testimony in human rights work, indigenous cultural history, community and indigenous radio, and women’s articulation of their rights to speak and be heard. She also explores transborder support for APPO, particularly among Oaxacan immigrants in Los Angeles. The book is supplemented by a website featuring video testimonials, pictures, documents, and a timeline of key events.

About The Author

Lynn Stephen is Distinguished Professor of Arts and Sciences, Professor of Anthropology, and Director of the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies at the University of Oregon. She is the author of Transborder Lives: Indigenous Oaxacans in Mexico, California, and Oregon and Zapotec Women: Gender, Class, and Ethnicity in Globalized Oaxaca, both also published by Duke University Press.