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Posts under tag: Peruvian Literature

October 20, 2015

Public Lecture “Documenting the Iskonawa of the Amazon: Challenges to the Latin American Literary Canon”

Thursday, October 29th, 2015
3:30 p.m. Browsing Room, Knight Library.

Through interdisciplinary research and recent fieldwork, this talk will present an ongoing project that documents an endangered community: the Iskonawa of the Peruvian central Amazon forest. The Iskonawa oral tradition is full of knowledge about nature and survival strategies that speak volumes about the environment and the possibility of coexistence among humans and between humans and nature. However, like all indigenous societies in Latin America, the Isknonawa are threatened by deforestation, contamination, crime and drug trafficking. This case study also sheds light on canonic texts of the indigenista literary tradition and challenges some premises of postcolonial and decolonial theory.

October 13, 2015

Prof. Carlos Aguirre publishes book on Censorship and Latin American Literary Boom

CarlosAguirreLaciudadylosperrosLPG-640x441Ciudad y Perros Biografia Former director of Latin American Studies at UO, Professor Carlos Aguirre (History) has published a new book entitled La ciudad y los perros. Biografía de una novela (Lima: Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, 2015). This is a groundbreaking archival study that reconstructs the process of censorship and the difficulties experienced by Peruvian writer Vargas Llosa at the time of publishing his first novel in Franco’s Spain in 1963. Aguirre sets out to investigate the historical and cultural conditions that make possible the “manufacture” of a literary classic. He looks at the transnational networks of intellectuals and literary agents, political factions, potential diplomatic conflicts and the background tensions of the Cold War in the immediate aftermath of the Cuban Revolution.

You can read an interview with Prof. Aguirre by Luis Rodríguez Pastor here.