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Posts under tag: Central America

May 1, 2018

Solalinde – Annual Las Casas Lecture on Human Rights

The 2018 Annual Las Casas Lecture on Human Rights Thursday May 3rd 5:30-7:00 p.m. in PLC180.

This year’s speaker is Mexican priest Father Alejandro Solalinde, a candidate to the Nobel Peace Prize in 2017 and a tireless fighter for migrant rights in Mexico. He is the founder of the network of shelters hermanosenelcamino.org and has been the target of death threats, harassment, as well as institutional ostracism from both church and state in Mexico. His talk The Migrant’s Path/El camino del migrants will address the ongoing humanitarian crisis of Central American refugees who cross through Mexico on their way North to the US and who become victimized by both narcos and police forces intent on charging a hefty “fee” for their passage in the form of money, but very often, psychological and physical abuse, rape, torture and in many cases death and disappearance.

 

April 26, 2016

A Bold Peace – Costa Rica’s Demilitarization

On April 27, 6-8:00 pm in Straub Hall 145, UO Sociology Professor Michael Dreiling will screen his revelatory documentary, A Bold Peace, on the impact of Costa Rica’s radical choice of national disarmament. Hors d’oeuvres and refreshments. Comments and a Q&A will follow the film.

www.aboldpeace.com – trailer & press kit

TRT: 105 minutes

English, Spanish with English SubtitlesABoldPeace

More than 60 years ago, Costa Rica became one of the only nations in the world to disband their military and to redirect national resources towards education, health, and the environment. Since then, Costa Rica has earned the number one spot in the Happy Planet Index, a ranking of countries based on the ecological footprint to behind the happiness and health of its citizens.

A Bold Peace juxtaposes the national policy of demilitarization (since 1948-49) with their investment in education, health, and the environment. Pointed parallels and contrasts are made with recent U.S. debates over the national debt, healthcare, the environment, and the escalating cost of U.S. militarism. The film builds from historical footage leading to the 1948 revolution and extensive interviews of former presidents, officials and scholars from the University of Costa Rica, Costa Rican government officials and ambassadors, leaders of major national co-operatives, and journalists and citizens of Costa Rica. Unfortunately, the Costa Rican example has received very little international attention. This documentary film brings attention to Costa Rica’s inspirational national project, answering why happiness, health, and human rights occupy a relatively prominent place in this Central American country.

Sponsored by: Latin American Studies, College of Arts & Sciences, International Studies, Political Science, Sociology, Global Justice Program, History, and the Crossings Institute