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Bienvenidos, Benvindos

Latin America is one of the most diverse and interesting regions in the world. The variety of peoples, cultures, languages, and environments makes the study of Latin America an exciting intellectual adventure. At the UO, students can earn a B.A. degree in Latin American Studies. A minor in Latin American Studies is also available. Our students receive a first-rate interdisciplinary training with study abroad and internship opportunities in seven different countries and language instruction in Spanish and Portuguese. Core courses in Latin American Studies (LAS) are complemented by courses drawn from departments and programs such as History, Anthropology, Ethnic Studies, Philosophy, Geography, Journalism, Spanish, Portuguese, International Studies, and Environmental Studies. Read more…


Activities

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Spring Film Series. Ayotzinapa: Crónica de un crimen de estado

Film Viewing: Ayotzinapa: Crónica de un crimen de estado

Ayotzinapa: Chronicle of a Crime of State is the story of the forced disappearance of 43 student teachers, which exposes the criminal complicity between the police and military authorities, and the political and economic elite of Mexico. TRT 101 minutes.

May 4th, 2016 5:00 p.m. Straub 156

Film to be followed by a round table with Anabel López Salinas (CLLAS Postdoctoral Fellow), Erin Gallo (PhD candidate in Romance Languages), Eduardo Corona (Center for Intercultural Organizing, Washington County), Pedro García-Caro (Director,

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Julie Weise (History) publishes Corazón de Dixie: Mexicanos in the U.S. South since 1910

Julie Weise’s new book on Mexicanos in the South has just been released by University of North Carolina Press. Julie Weise is an assistant professor in the UO Department of History and a faculty member associated with LAS and CLLAS.

Corazón de Dixie: Mexicanos in the U.S. South since 1910, by Julie M. Weise (November 2015, University of North Carolina Press) 358 pp., published with support provided by the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas; David J. Weber Series in the New Borderlands History.

When Latino migration to

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